Students Want to Know Jennifer Banash, author of Silent Alarm

Jennifer Banash is the author of The Elite, White Lines, and the recently published novel Silent Alarm. Thanks to Jennifer and Penguin, some of my students were afforded the opportunity to read ARCs of Silent Alarm and ask Jennifer questions about the book.

Jennifer Banash 2


Jennifer Banash’s website
Follow Jennifer on Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram


Silent AlarmSummary (From Goodreads):
Alys’s whole world was comprised of the history project that was due, her upcoming violin audition, being held tightly in the arms of her boyfriend, Ben, and laughing with her best friend, Delilah. At least it was—until she found herself on the wrong end of a shotgun in the school library. Her suburban high school had become one of those places you hear about on the news—a place where some disaffected youth decided to end it all and take as many of his teachers and classmates with him as he could. Except, in this story, that youth was Alys’s own brother, Luke. He killed fifteen others and himself, but spared her—though she’ll never know why.
Alys’s downward spiral begins instantly, and there seems to be no bottom. A heartbreaking and beautifully told story.



My students Hannah and Rachel asked the following questions:


What inspired you to write a book revolving around a school shooting?
Well, I’m a high school teacher, and while school shootings aren’t something I’ve experienced first hand, thank goodness, they are something I think about more and more these days as they’re happening much more frequently. I’d also been reading news articles about shootings at the time I had the idea to write the book, and one of them mentioned that the shooter in that particular case had a younger sister. I started imagining what things were like for her, and Silent Alarm was born!


Why did you decide to write about the sister’s recovery instead of the events of the shooting?
I felt that so many books and films had already covered shootings themselves, so I wasn’t particularly interested in exploring them further or telling the story from the gunman’s perspective. I wanted to write about the people who are also victims in these kinds of events–the families who are left behind to clean up the mess.


Would you consider writing a book about the events leading up to and including the shooting in the perspective of Luke? 
Actually, I wouldn’t. It’s Alys’ book, and I feel like by the end of the novel, both she–and Luke–achieve some kind of closure, or are on their way towards it. To me, at least, I feel like the story is finished, The point of the book is that sometimes there are no concrete answers when tragedies like these happen–there are no easy answers at all. And going back in time and retracing Luke’s last days wouldn’t really provide them either. What happens to Luke occurs over the course of many years–not days.


  1. What a great opportunity for your students — both to get the ARC and to ask her questions! I love their questions, too. Very incisive.

    • Mrs. Andersen says:

      Thank you, Caryn. I have really great, bright students. They were thrilled by this opportunity.

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