My 2015 Reading Year

In the past I’ve written a few posts summing up my favorite reads of those years. Honestly, I don’t have time to do that this year so I’m going to compile it all into one post.

I’ve read 71 novels in 2015, 29 of which were audiobooks. I’ve read at least 55 picture books this year (courtesy of Jack), and most of those have been read over and over and over again. I’ve also abandoned a handful of books.

This year I’ve focused on expanding my repertoire of different genres/authors and am happy with the results:

Mystery: 10 novels
Historical Fiction: 4 novels (not many, but all within this school year)
Fantasy: 6 novels
Memoir: 4 novels (I have a couple in queue for 2016)
New to me/Debut authors: 40 novels

Based on my list of top ten favorite books of 2015, it’s obvious that contemporary realistic fiction is my favorite genre to read. This list is in no particular order because it would be way too hard to narrow it down.

Dumplin’ by Julie Murphy (my review): I can’t imagine my list of favorite 2015 reads existing without this book on the list. It’s outstanding and Willowdean will probably stay one of my absolute favorite characters for a long time. Plus, it was a great audiobook.

Violent Ends by Shaun Hutchinson and 16 additional authors: I still need to write a book review for this, which I’m mad at myself for not having done sooner. This is the type of book that all teachers should read. It’s being passed from reader to reader in one of my senior classes right now and I couldn’t be happier about that. There are a number of characters in this novel who are still on my mind even a month or so after reading it.

Walk on Earth a Stranger by Rae Carson (my review): This read more like historical fiction to me than fantasy, which worked perfectly fine. The audio is fantastic and really kept me hooked. I’m a huge Rae Carson fan which is one of the reasons I’m using The Girl of Fire and Thorns as a hero’s journey book club book with my freshmen. In one class, however, only two students chose to read that (totally surprised me) and one of students ended up being unsure about whether she wanted to stick with it. That student didn’t want to leave her peer behind though, so she didn’t know what to do. I had my copy of Walk on Earth a Stranger handy, so I suggested she try reading it instead so she and her other group member could maybe at least read books by the same author. My student came in the next day and was so excited about Walk on Earth a Stranger that she realized since it’s so awesome The Girl of Fire and Thorns must be just as great too. She’s now reading both books. Total win.

P.S. I Still Love You by Jenny Han: Here’s another book that I wish I would have reviewed after I finished reading it. I loved The Summer I Turned Pretty and To All the Boys I’ve Loved Before, but P.S. I Still Love You officially made me a Jenny Han fangirl. I felt like I was right there experiencing everything with Lara Jean as I read it. Jenny Han made me feel like I was part of Lara Jean’s family; I was left feeling kind of sad when I finished reading because I wasn’t ready to leave those characters behind. It would be perfectly okay with me if she writes a third book or even a book written from Kitty’s point of view. I’d pre-order either book!

Things We Know by Heart by Jessi Kirby (my review): I feel like all I’ve done this year is spread the book love for Things We Know by Heart, but I love it so much it’s hard not to. Thankfully my students trust my recommendations and have been thoroughly enjoying it as well. One of my freshmen has read it more than once and even created her own playlist for it. Another teacher in my building was reading it at the same time as one of her students and told me about how much fun it was to discuss Quinn’s story as they both read it.

A Court of Thorns and Roses by Sarah J. Maas (my review): My goodness, if you want to read a steamy fantasy, add this one to your list. I was seriously bummed when I found out that ARCs weren’t going to be made for the sequel, A Court of Mist and Fury, because I have been wanting to read it for almost a year now!

Denton Little’s Deathdate by Lance Rubin: Time got away from me and I didn’t write my review after listening to this audiobook. Oh my goodness, is this debut funny and engaging! I didn’t want to stop listening to the audio because it was seriously that good. When I was at NCTE I requested the sequel, but they didn’t have it. Honestly, I’m kind of glad they didn’t have it because I think I want to listen to the audio again. If you’ve been wanting to read more sci-fi, but it isn’t really your cup of tea, I’d read Denton’s story; it’s what I like to call sci-fi lite. The idea behind the story could be classified as science fiction, but the story reads very much like realistic fiction, if that makes sense.

The Naturals by Jennifer Lynn Barnes: I read and thoroughly enjoyed The Fixer over the summer which is also written by Jennifer Lynn Barnes. It was actually the first book of hers that I’ve read. Because I enjoyed it so much and because many of my friends have read and recommended The Naturals, I decided to give the audio for it a go. I have to say, Jennifer Lynn Barnes is fast becoming one of my favorite mystery authors. The narrator for this was really good and paced the story well. It’s a little bit predictable, but the reveal was still fun. This is perfect for fans of the TV show Criminal Minds and the books I Hunt Killers and The Body Finder. The only complaint I have is that I’ve been told there most likely won’t be audiobooks made for books two and three in this trilogy.

Stand-Off by Andrew Smith: Ryan Dean West is another one of my absolute favorite characters. I’m so thankful that we’ve been gifted with the rest of his story after such a tough ending in Winger. I adored this book and was left completely satisfied when I finished reading it. Of course, if Andrew Smith decides to write a third book about Ryan Dean I won’t complain; I’ll pre-order it as soon as it’s available if that ever becomes an option. What I really liked about Stand-Off is that it’s still laugh out loud funny, but it’s also full of heart and introspective moments for Ryan Dean. It reminded me of what Geoff Herbach crafted in I’m With Stupid as he wrapped up Felton’s story.
P.S. I’m sorry I didn’t write a full review after I finished reading this. I was racing to get all the things read and finalized for NCTE.

The Serpent King by Jeff Zentner: I received an ARC of this when I was at NCTE and it’s the only 2016 title I’ve read so far. It feels like cheating adding a 2016 title to this list, but there’s no way I can be honest about this list and not include it. In fact, Jeff Zentner’s debut will be on my 2016 favorites list as well because it’s utterly fabulous. I’ll probably read it a second time if my students don’t hog my copy, but I’m predicting this is going to be a book I rarely see during the school year. I promise to write a full review in time for the March 2016 release, but I’ll leave you with this: The Serpent King was reading in almost one sitting–which is nearly impossible to do these days–and it made me ugly cry FOR MULTIPLE PAGES.

And because I can’t stop at ten and because I don’t like leaving good books off my list, here are some titles I’ve read in 2015 that my students are loving this school year:

Everything, Everything by Nicola Yoon: My students and I really dig the multigenre format to this novel; it makes for a quick and engaging read.

A Matter of Heart by Amy Fellner Dominy: I love it when authors feature athletic girls in their stories and make that aspect of the character a primary focus in the story. There aren’t enough female characters who are student athletes in YA novels, which is a real disservice to our teens. I was a swimmer in high school and the high school I teach at has an impressive swimming program, so Abby’s story really resonates with my students.

I’ll Give You the Sun by Jandy Nelson: I listened to the audio for this before it was announced as the 2015 Printz winner and was over the moon thrilled about it. As usual for the past few years, we had a snow day when the awards were announced so I had to wait to tell my students all about the win. Since last school year I’ll Give You the Sun has been passed from reader to reader in my classroom. My freshmen last year kept a constant waitlist for it and have even told my current freshmen about it. I love it when a book becomes so widely loved that my students recommend it to friends outside my class. Also, the audio for this is fabulous!

 

I’d love to know which books were your 2015 favorites! Happy New Year, lovely readers!

 

 

Top Ten Tuesday: My Favorite Books From the Past 3 Years

Top Ten Tuesday

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and The Bookish

Even though this is still a tough list to narrow down, I’m happy this TTT topic isn’t simply my all-time favorite books; I would never be able to narrow it down! I’d love to know which books have been your favorites over the past 3-5 years; maybe I’ll be able to add more to my to read list.

I’m focusing my list on what I read and loved between the years 2012, 2013, and 2014. Since there’s still so much to read this year I’m not including it.

Favorites read in 2012:

Boy 21 by Matthew Quick (My review): This book will forever be a favorite of mine. It fits so many categories and no matter how many times I’ve read it (and I’ve read it a lot courtesy of reading it aloud) it pulls on my heart strings EVERY TIME.

Something Like Normal by Trish Doller (My review): The fact that I considered naming my first child Travis should be explanation enough, right?

Easy by Tammara Webber (My review): Easy was one of the first New Adult books I read and it caused a book hangover. I had to read a few books after finishing this one before I got over it.

Catching Jordan by Miranda Kenneally (My review): This is Miranda’s debut and it’s still my favorite of the five books she’s published so far.

Favorites read in 2013:

Wild Awake by Hilary T. Smith (My review): A beautiful cover, quote-worthy passages, and an imperfect character make this a winner.

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Saenz (My review): This is such a beautiful story of friendship and love.

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell (My review): Speaking of a beautiful story of friendship and love, I couldn’t get enough of Eleanor and Park’s story. I’m still wanting more.

Where the Stars Still Shine by Trish Doller (My review): Trish Doller is on this list twice; you’ve read these books, right?!

Winger by Andrew Smith (My review): It’s not very often that a book makes me laugh and cry within a few pages. It’s no wonder Ryan Dean’s story is one of the most popular titles in my classroom library this year.

Favorite read in 2014:

The Sea of Tranquility by Katja Millay (My review): Reading in 2014 was off for me, but this debut stands out more than all the rest. The slow burning relationship between Josh and Nastya is perfect and moving.

Top Ten Tuesday Collage

Unleashing Readers Blog Hop–Reading Favorites

Kellee Moye and Ricki Ginsberg created a new blog called Unleashing Readers.  It’s designed to help teachers find the resources they need when teaching reading and various types of literature.  A group of us (teachers) have been asked to participate in a blog hop and share a few of our favorite books that we use for different types of reading.

Unleashing Readers LaunchWeek2

1. My favorite read aloud–This is a tough one because I’ve read so many books aloud and I always get a different reaction from every class.  Right now Boy 21 by Matthew Quick and The One and Only Ivan by Katherine Applegate are tied.  They couldn’t be more different in terms of audience, plot, and characters, but my students have loved both for many reasons.  And I love reading them aloud and how I feel while reading them.

Boy21The One and Only Ivan

2. My favorite close read/analysis book–I’ve been thinking about this one for a few days now, and I’m still not sure.  My YA Lit students read Breathing Underwater by Alex Flinn and almost every time I teach that class, my students find something different to discuss or analyze.  We spend a lot of time comparing Nick in the past (based on his journals) and Nick in the present (after the restraining order).  We also discuss his future, his family background, how society reacts to stories like his, and so on.

If I’m choosing a classic, I think I’d go with Lord of the Flies and Hamlet.

Breathing Underwater Original Cover

3. My favorite lit circle/book club book–I’m honestly still navigating lit circles because I never feel like I get them right.  A lit circle book works best when there’s plenty to discuss.  According to my students, it can’t drag on and be too slow either. 😉  My YA Lit II students appeared to really enjoy discussing Unwind by Neal Shusterman in their lit circles.    There are multiple points of view, plenty of big issues, lots of action, diverse characters, etc.

unwind-cover

4. My favorite book for my classroom library–I had to pack up all of my books this summer because many of us are switching classrooms, myself included.  I counted up my books and I think the final total ended up around 1,300.  So this is a tough one to decide on because I have so many books to choose from!  I’m cheating, again, and choosing more than one.  My favorite book for girls who want to read something edgy even though they don’t like reading would be Living Dead Girl by Elizabeth Scott.  It hooks them almost every single time, but this is a TOUGH read. I’ve had more than one student put it back, but almost all of those girls want to read another book after they finish it.  For my boys who need something funny to hold their attention, I am choosing Swim the Fly by Don Calame and Stupid Fast by Geoff Herbach.  Both are funny books that hook my reluctant guys, but there’s also something more than humor in each book.

livingdeadgirlStupid FastSwim the Fly audio

5. My favorite book in general–I don’t have kids yet, but that is like asking me to choose a favorite child. Oh my goodness.  Speak by Laurie Halse Anderson was one of the books I read for my college YA Lit class and it struck a cord with me.  I remember being so disappointed that I wasn’t going to be in class the day we discussed this one because I had so much to say about it.  After finishing it, I wanted to read more books like it.  I’ve read it aloud multiple times to my freshmen classes.  Laurie Halse Anderson was the first author I’ve Skyped with.  Whenever a new edition of Speak comes out, I buy it.  I don’t connect with it on a personal level, but it stayed with me.

Speak

My Favorite Books of 2013 (So Far)

toptentuesday-New

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and The Bookish

For today’s Top Ten Tuesday post, we’re supposed to compose a list of our favorite books of 2013 (so far).  This was a harder list to create than I thought it would be; it would probably be easier to create at the end of the summer after I’ve been able to catch up on my reading.  Some of these titles will remain on the list at the end of the year, but I know many will be replaced by even better titles.  It will be fun to find discover those books!

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the Universe by Benjamin Alire Sáenz (Goodreads) (My mini review)–This will remain a favorite at the end of the year.  I hope many of my students will read this in the future.

Eleanor and Park by Rainbow Rowell (Goodreads) (My review)–Not only will this definitely be a favorite at the end of the year, Rainbow Rowell is a new favorite author.

Aristotle and Dante Discover the Secrets of the UniverseEleanor & Park

I’m With Stupid by Geoff Herbach (Goodreads) (My review)–What a way to end a truly wonderful trilogy.

One for the Murphys by Lynda Mullaly Hunt (Goodreads) (Review posts on Friday)–I just finished reading this and can’t stop thinking about Carley and the Murphys.  Plus, I’m still sniffling.

I'm With Stupid new coverOne for the Murphys

Wild Awake by Hilary T. Smith (Goodreads) (My review)–I love the characters in this 2013 debut, but I think the writing is what really won me over.

The Help by Kathryn Stockett (Goodreads)–So I’m definitely cheating here because I haven’t finished this yet, but I’m loving the audio and the story way too much not to include it on this list.  It’s fabulous.

Wild AwakeThe Help

Out of the Easy by Ruta Sepetys (Goodreads) (My review)–I liked this more than Between Shades of Gray.

Okay for Now by Gary D. Schmidt (Goodreads)–This is another fantastic audiobook that I thoroughly enjoyed.  It’s middle grade, historical fiction, and full of well-developed characters.  Listening to the audio meant I missed out on seeing the different birds from Audobon’s Birds of America, however.

Out of the EasyOkay for Now

Game by Barry Lyga (Goodreads) (My review)–This was even better than I Hunt Killers and it has a crazy cliffhanger!

Dead Silence by Kimberly Derting (Goodreads) (My review)–This is one of my absolute favorite series, and even though I haven’t heard of a fifth book in the series, I’m still holding out hope that this isn’t the last book!

GameDead Silence

Favorite Books of 2012

To be honest, this has been kind of a tough reading year for me.  I finished my Masters, I’ve been working on feeling better and getting healthier, and I’ve been working my butt off in my classroom (new classes, new units, etc.).  I’ve still read a large amount of books, but I’m hoping 2013 will be a smoother, easier reading year.

Putting this list together wasn’t any easier this year than it was last year, but I’m happy with the group of books I’ve decided on.  This is a list of the ten books that have stayed with me this year.  They aren’t numbered in any particular order.

Born Wicked by Jessica Spotswood (Goodreads)–I’ve blogged about this debut quite a few times this year and it’s because it’s just that good.  I love the time period, the romance, the magic, the characters, etc.  The sequel doesn’t release until later in 2013 unfortunately, but it will be worth the wait.

Embrace by Jessica Shirvington (Goodreads)–I still enjoy reading paranormal fantasy, but it’s not as alluring as it used to be.  Jessica Shirvington’s Embrace series, however, has held my interest because it’s exciting, mysterious, and oh-so-swoonworthy.

The Raven Boys by Maggie Stiefvater (Goodreads)–Maggie Stiefvater is a rock star.  I love the magical realism in this story and even though I read this over the summer, I’m still thinking about the characters and the awesome ending.

Born WickedEmbraceThe Raven Boys

Leverage by Joshua C. Cohen (Goodreads)–This actually released in 2011, but I didn’t read it until this year.  If you haven’t read it yet, and you can handle a gut-wrenching story about bullying, I highly recommend you get a copy.  It recently released in paperback which helps a book budget.  The characters in this book are sure to stay with you for a long time after you finish reading it.

Ask the Passengers by A.S. King (Goodreads)–I just read this a couple days ago, and I knew it had to go on this list.  There’s a reason A.S. King is one of my absolute favorite authors and Astrid’s story is now one of my top reasons.

Wonder by R.J. Palacio (Goodreads)–This is technically a middle grade title, and I did read it with my ears, but Auggie’s story is for everyone of all ages.  This is an incredibly touching story that begs to be read by everyone.

LeverageAsk the PassengersWonder Book Cover

Easy by Tammara Webber (Goodreads)–If you’re new to the world of New Adult like I am, I suggest starting with Easy.  This book is seriously awesome and one I could not put down.  I love the character growth, the steamy romance, the setting, everything.

Freshman Year & Other Unnatural Disasters by Meredith Zeitlin (Goodreads)–Sometimes I need a lighthearted book that will make me smile and laugh.  This debut did all of that and more.  I love reading it to my YA Lit classes because it works well as a read aloud and it’s that much fun to read over and over again.

Boy21 by Matthew Quick (Goodreads)–I’ve praised this book over and over again and I won’t stop.  It’s a great story about friendship, loyalty, self-discovery, and family.  I hope you read it.

Something Like Normal by Trish Doller (Goodreads)–As soon as I finished this debut I knew it was going to be a 2012 favorite.  But let’s be honest, it’s an all-time favorite.  I’m still thinking about Travis and Harper and I read this back in the spring.  Trish Doller is an author to watch.

easyFreshman Year & Other Unnatural DisastersBoy21Something Like Normal

Can I Switch Places With These Characters, Please?

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and The Bookish

 

Top Ten Tuesday is one of my favorite memes, especially when we get a prompt like today’s.  So often when reviewing and discussing books, we mention our love of the setting/world or how we would love to spend time with the characters.  Today’s prompt asks us to list the ten characters we’d like to switch places with for 24 hours.  Here we go!

Along for the Ride by Sarah Dessen (Goodreads)–I don’t really want to deal with Auden’s home life, but I love the town she’s staying in over the summer.  I love beach town settings, and this one’s a favorite.  Plus, I like Eli 🙂

City of Bones by Cassandra Clare (Goodreads)–I can’t say that I’d be very good at demon hunting or anything like that, but I would love to cuddle up with Jace and hang out with Simon!  Clary can go ahead and sit a day out so I can have fun with these Shadowhunters + Simon!

Nick & Norah’s Infinite Playlist by Rachel Cohn & David Levithan (Goodreads)–This is still one of my favorite books because it’s incredibly funny and I love the cast of characters.  I’d totally be okay with switching places with Norah and running around New York with Nick all night.  I’ve never been to New York City, and I don’t have a character crush on Nick or anything, but he’s a cool guy and he really knows his music.  How fun would it be to hop from crazy New York club to crazy New York club all night with your friends!

Anna and the French Kiss by Stephanie Perkins (Goodreads)–If you’ve read this book, I don’t think I need to explain myself, do I?  Living in Paris for a school year.  Eating delicious crepes.  Going to famous museums.  Etienne St. Clair.  Enough said. 🙂

Freshman Year & Other Unnatural Disasters by Meredith Zeitlin (Goodreads)–I really have no desire to repeat my high school years, but I would love to spend a day with Kelsey Finkelstein because she is so darn funny.  I love how melodramatic she is and how loyal she is to her friends.  If I could choose a day, I’d choose the last day the school play is performed.  I’m pretty sure that would be the best.  Or the night of the tooth mishap.  Either would be funny.

Born Wicked by Jessica Spotswood (Goodreads): I love this book’s time period and the powers the girls have.  And I have a book crush on Finn.  It would be fun to spend a day in the garden with Finn and maybe part of the afternoon at a gossipy tea gathering.  Writing this makes me feel like I’m an old soul or something because I don’t know many people who would want to spend their day like this! 😛

Small Medium at Large by Joanne Levy (Goodreads): This is one of the cutest middle grade books I’ve read, first of all.  Second, I would absolutely love to spend a day in Lilah’s shoes so I could communicate with my Grandma Rosemary.  I love that Lilah gets to spend more time with her Bubbie.  Those of us who have lost grandparents know how special and precious that extra time would be.

In Honor by Jessi Kirby (Goodreads)–Am I allowed to pretend Honor isn’t honoring her brother that just died?  Because if so, I’d switch places with her for a day.  I’d want to spend time getting to know Rusty, and I think it would be cool to revisit the scene when she’s swimming really early in the morning.  For the most part, their trip to California was fun to read (with the exception of a few sad/scary parts).

I know that’s not ten characters I want to switch with, but it’s the best I can do today.  Let me know which character you’d like to switch with!  I’m sure I’ll feel the same way, or even better, find a new book I want to read!  Happy Tuesday! 😀

My Favorite Books of 2011

Top Ten Tuesday is hosted by The Broke and The Bookish.

I’ve read over 100 books in 2011 which includes a mix of young adult, middle grade, graphic novels, etc.  Creating a list of favorites is no easy task, but it’s also fun to look back at the books I’ve read.  I based my decision on the books that have stuck with me whether it’s because of strong characters, impressive writing, and/or deep emotional connections.  I can’t encourage you enough to read these novels!

P.S. Some favorites of 2011 I’m not listing because I read them in 2010, but they’ll be mentioned in my upcoming favorite debut authors post 🙂

In no particular order (because creating this list was hard enough!), here are my favorite books of 2011:

Everybody Sees the Ants by A.S. King (My Review) (Goodreads)

Something Like Hope by Shawn Goodman (My Review) (Goodreads)

Rival by Sara Bennett Wealer (My Review) (Goodreads)

Stupid Fast by Geoff Herbach (My Review) (Goodreads)

Warped by Maurissa Guibord (My Review) (Goodreads)

Where She Went by Gayle Forman (My Review) (Goodreads)

Lola and the Boy Next Door by Stephanie Perkins (My Review) (Goodreads)

Split by Swati Avasthi (My Review) (Goodreads)

A Monster Calls by Patrick Ness (My Flash Review) (Goodreads)

But I Love Him by Amanda Grace (My Review) (Goodreads)

Everybody Sees the Ants by A.S. King

A.S. King Everybody Sees the Ants

288 pp.  Little, Brown and Company  2011

Source: ARC gifted by a friend

Release Date: October 3, 2011

Summary (From Goodreads):

Lucky Linderman didn’t ask for his life. He didn’t ask his grandfather not to come home from the Vietnam War. He didn’t ask for a father who never got over it. He didn’t ask for a mother who keeps pretending their family is fine. And he certainly didn’t ask to be the recipient of Nadar McMillan’s relentless bullying, which has finally gone too far.

Lucky has a secret—one that helps him wade through the daily dysfunction of his life. Grandad Harry, trapped in the jungles of Laos, has been visiting Lucky in his dreams—and the dreams just might be real: an alternate reality where he can be whoever he wants to be and his life might still be worth living. But how long can Lucky remain in hiding there before reality forces its way inside?

Printz Honor recipient A. S. King’s distinctive, smart, and accessible writing shines in this powerful novel about learning to cope with the shrapnel life throws at you, and then taking a stand against it.

I need to say this first–Everybody Sees the Ants is one of the BEST books I’ve read.  I was completely engrossed in this novel and couldn’t put it down.  Pre-order a copy of this book, ask your librarian to get a copy for your library, mark its release on your calendars.

Lucky Linderman is an underdog that deserves so much more from life.  He’s constantly bullied by Nadar McMillan, he feels misunderstood by his parents, and he’s haunted in his dreams by his POW grandfather whom he’s never met.  Nadar’s bullying actually gets pretty extreme, so Lucky’s mom decides to take him to Arizona so they can stay with her brother and sister-in-law.  This is when we learn quite a bit about Lucky and just how layered and troubled he is.  He’s on the innocent side of the spectrum when it comes to teenage boys, which makes him even more endearing.  Lucky isn’t oblivious to what people say about him either.  His aunt openly says how she worries about him being at-risk.  I loved it when Lucky had a witty comeback for her, whether he said it aloud or to himself.  Lucky Linderman is a character that I cheered for throughout the entire novel.  He needs self-esteem and the confidence to speak up for himself.

A.S. King did something different by having Lucky see the ants.  I can’t say for sure what the ants are exactly, but I pictured them as Lucky’s cheering squad that he could imagine during tough situations.  The ants weren’t present throughout the whole book, but by the time they entered the story I knew how badly Lucky needed them.  He doesn’t really have any friends or people he feels he can rely on until he gets to Arizona.  There, along with the ants, he bonds with his uncle and meets the mysterious girl next door.  After one scene about 3/4 of the way into the book, I was so shocked and heart broken I had to put the book down; this scene took my breath away and I needed a minute to digest what I read.  I was already impressed by A.S. King as I was reading this book, but these scenes really impressed me.

I pictured so many of my students when I read this book.  I can think of quiet students who I know have a lot to say that will want to read this book.  I can picture some of my students who love a great contemporary/realistic fiction novel that will love this book.  I can picture my students who have been bullied who will connect with Lucky.  I really hope you’ll read Everybody Sees the Ants when it releases in October.

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