Review: Dream Things True by Marie Marquardt

Dream Things TrueTitle: Dream Things True

Author: Marie Marquardt

Publisher: St. Martin’s Griffin

Release Date: September 1st, 2015

Interest: Contemp / Diversity / Retelling

Source: e-ARC provided by the publisher

Summary (From Goodreads):

A modern-day Romeo and Juliet story in which a wealthy Southern boy falls in love with an undocumented Mexican girl and together they face perils in their hostile Georgia town.

Evan, a soccer star and the nephew of a conservative Southern Senator, has never wanted for much — except a functional family. Alma has lived in Georgia since she was two-years-old, excels in school, and has a large, warm Mexican family. Never mind their differences, the two fall in love, and they fall hard. But when ICE (Immigration and Customs Enforcement) begins raids on their town, Alma knows that she needs to tell Evan her secret. There’s too much at stake. But how to tell her country-club boyfriend that she’s an undocumented immigrant? That her whole family and most of her friends live in the country without permission. What follows is a beautiful, nuanced, well-paced exploration of the complications of immigration, young love, defying one’s family, and facing a tangled bureaucracy that threatens to completely upend two young lives.

I really enjoy teaching Romeo & Juliet, so when Dream Things True was pitched as a modern retelling of the famous tragedy I knew I had to read it. Evan and Alma are certainly star-crossed lovers considering Evan comes from a wealthy family and Alma is and comes from an undocumented Mexican family. Alma’s story really captured my attention since I haven’t read many (any?) YA novels focusing on undocumented citizens.

Marie Marquardt brings to light an issue that many of us are aware of, but may not truly know how it affects people. Alma’s family is close-knit and loyal to one another; they look out for one another, even their families still in Mexico. Through Alma readers are able to see what life as an undocumented citizen is like. Marie Marquardt never makes this feel like an issue book, but the tension between politicians, American citizens, and undocumented citizens is evident. I’m looking forward to discussing this with my students as they read Dream Things True, especially since it’s not a topic we typically discuss in class.

The story of Alma, her family, Evan, and his family is a balanced one, but there’s an additional storyline added that deals with date rape. Honestly, I know why it’s included because it’s a good way to make a certain character more antagonistic, but it distracted me from the story. It felt excessive to me. I would have been completely find continuing to read Alma and Evan’s story without it or with a different storyline to layer the conflict.

Other than that issue I enjoyed Dream Things True. I liked making connections to Romeo & Juliet and wondering as I read which scenes and characters my students would recognize. I also appreciate that readers can read this book and not connect it in any way to Shakespeare’s famous tragedy; nothing is lost if a reader isn’t familiar with the story.

 

Book Trailer Thursday (175)–Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige

Book Trailer Thursday

Dorothy Must Die by Danielle Paige released in April 2014, so it’s not exactly new by any means, but I recently started listening to the audio and I love it! The only problem is that I was listening to the audio with my Scribd app and one morning an alert popped up stating that the audio was no longer available due to something about the author or publisher. I was SO disappointed! And annoyed. Now I have to wait until next month when I get another Audible credit to finish listening to it since Audible still has the audio available.

Dorothy Must DieSummary (From Goodreads):

I didn’t ask for any of this. I didn’t ask to be some kind of hero.

But when your whole life gets swept up by a tornado – taking you with it – you have no choice but to go along, you know?

Sure, I’ve read the books. I’ve seen the movies. I know the song about the rainbow and the happy little bluebirds. But I never expected Oz to look like this. To be a place where Good Witches can’t be trusted, Wicked Witches may just be the good guys, and winged monkeys can be executed for acts of rebellion. There’s still a yellow brick road – but even that’s crumbling.

What happened? Dorothy.

They say she found a way to come back to Oz. They say she seized power and the power went to her head. And now no one is safe.

My name is Amy Gumm – and I’m the other girl from Kansas.

I’ve been recruited by the Revolutionary Order of the Wicked.

I’ve been trained to fight.

And I have a mission.

Book Trailer Thursday (173)–Blood and Salt by Kim Liggett

Book Trailer Thursday

Another Romeo & Juliet retelling this year? Count me in! This fall is going to be delightfully full of eerie, creepy reading. 🙂 Blood and Salt by Kim Liggett releases on September 22nd.

Blood and SaltSummary (From Goodreads):

Romeo and Juliet meets Children of the Corn in this one-of-a-kind romantic horror.

“When you fall in love, you will carve out your heart and throw it into the deepest ocean. You will be all in—blood and salt.”

These are the last words Ash Larkin hears before her mother returns to the spiritual commune she escaped long ago. But when Ash follows her to Quivira, Kansas, something sinister and ancient waits among the rustling cornstalks of this village lost to time.

Ash is plagued by memories of her ancestor, Katia, which harken back to the town’s history of unrequited love and murder, alchemy and immortality. Charming traditions soon give way to a string of gruesome deaths, and Ash feels drawn to Dane, a forbidden boy with secrets of his own.

As the community prepares for a ceremony five hundred years in the making, Ash must fight not only to save her mother, but herself—and discover the truth about Quivira before it’s too late. Before she’s all in—blood and salt.

Blog Tour Book Review: Anne & Henry by Dawn Ius

Anne & HenryTitle: Anne & Henry

Author: Dawn Ius

Publisher: Simon Pulse

Release Date: September 1st, 2015

Source: ARC received from the publisher

Interest: Contemporary retelling

Summary (From Goodreads):

In this wonderfully creative retelling of the infamous—and torrid—love affair between Anne Boleyn and King Henry VIII, history collides with the present when a sizzling romance ignites in a modern-day high school.

Henry Tudor’s life has been mapped out since the day he was born: student body president, valedictorian, Harvard Law School, and a stunning political career just like his father’s. But ever since the death of his brother, the pressure for Henry to be perfect has doubled. And now he’s trapped: forbidden from pursuing a life as an artist or dating any girl who isn’t Tudor-approved.

Then Anne Boleyn crashes into his life.

Wild, brash, and outspoken, Anne is everything Henry isn’t allowed to be—or want. But soon Anne is all he can think about. His mother, his friends, and even his girlfriend warn him away, but his desire for Anne consumes him.

Henry is willing to do anything to be with her, but once they’re together, will their romance destroy them both?

Inspired by the true story of Anne Boleyn and King Henry VIII, Anne & Henry beautifully reimagines the intensity, love, and betrayal between one of the most infamous couples of all time.

When Anne & Henry by Dawn Ius was pitched, I knew right away that I wanted to read it. I will admit that retellings haven’t always worked for me, but I’m so intrigued by the Tudors and Anne Boleyn that I couldn’t pass up this opportunity. Thankfully this retelling didn’t let me down.

First, I think you need to know that Anne & Henry is DRAMATIC! But it is also witty and fast-paced. The drama stems from quite a few character cliches like the jealous girlfriend, the jerky best friend, and the mysterious new girl, but those characters fit the retelling. In history Catherine was Henry’s ex-wife and Anne was this mysterious new mistress with a shady past. (Please forgive my loose history here.) I can think of some students who will eat this story up because of all the juicy drama. I don’t write this to deter anyone from reading Ius’s book, but I think it’s worth mentioning. It’s also worth mentioning that the storyline kept me engaged throughout.

One of the main reasons I was so engaged in the story is that Dawn Ius creatively modernized this historical relationship. I wasn’t sure how it would pan out, but once the story started moving along everything began to click. Henry “rules” his clique and the school. His family has blazed the trails for him to become a political leader. Anne’s character fits with Anne Boleyn’s history well because Anne has a troubled history with her sister and hooks Henry right away. Anne Boleyn was accused of witch craft and a couple times in Anne & Henry she’s described as “bewitching.” Catherine is repeatedly described as the more suitable partner for Henry and is therefor at odds with Anne. If you know the history then you know that Anne Boleyn was beheaded. Our Anne doesn’t actually lose her head, but heads certainly roll by the end of the book.

There were moments when Anne and Henry made choices (or chose not to make a choice) that upset me, but overall I enjoyed this book. The themes in Anne & Henry will resonate with my students, so I’m really looking forward to talking to them about this once they read it.

 

Book Trailer Thursday (168)–Hold Me Like a Breath by Tiffany Schmidt

Book Trailer Thursday

Retellings don’t always work for me, but Tiffany Schmidt’s retelling of “The Princess and the Pea” has me intrigued. The summary and book trailer for Hold Me Like a Breath remind me of Unwind by Neal Shusterman, which I loved, so I’m hopeful that Schmidt’s third book will be great as well. Regardless, I’m looking forward to getting my hands on a copy of this book.

Hold Me Like a BreathSummary (From Goodreads):

Penelope Landlow has grown up with the knowledge that almost anything can be bought or sold—including body parts. She’s the daughter of one of the three crime families that control the black market for organ transplants.

Penelope’s surrounded by all the suffocating privilege and protection her family can provide, but they can’t protect her from the autoimmune disorder that causes her to bruise so easily.

And in her family’s line of work no one can be safe forever.

All Penelope has ever wanted is freedom and independence. But when she’s caught in the crossfire as rival families scramble for prominence, she learns that her wishes come with casualties, that betrayal hurts worse than bruises, that love is a risk worth taking . . . and maybe she’s not as fragile as everyone thinks.

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